Press

Articles about and interviews with Elayne.

Showtime’s ‘I’m Dying Up Here’ finds the drama in comedy

Robert Loyd, Television Critic | Los Angeles Times | June 2, 2017

“I’m Dying Up Here,” Showtime’s amiably dark new drama about comedy, takes its name and material, though not exactly its characters, from William Knoedelseder’s book of the same name. That volume’s focus was Mitzi Shore, her Comedy Store and the comics who played there in the 1970s, including Richard Lewis, David Letterman, Robin Williams, Elayne Boosler, Jay Leno, Tim Reid and Tom Dreesen, along with many lost to time; his narrative arc put them on a collision course, culminating in a 1979 strike against the club that sundered some relationships forever more.

Read the full article on the Los Angeles Times.

A Look Back at the ’70s L.A. Club Scene That Gave Rise to Comedy Legends

Vulture | May 20, 2017

Brooklynite Elayne Boosler got her start in New York club circuit and became a regular headliner at the Improv. In the spring of 1976, she moved to L.A. to chase the rising scene and found herself among many of the comic pals she’d made in New York. She was, however, one of the few women in comedy at the time, and her confidence in the face of the challenges that presented was notable.

Read the full article on Vulture.

The All-Time Best Standup Comics On Cannabis, #50-41

From Civilized.life | By James McClure  |  Feb 23, 2017

Comedians have always pushed boundaries and questioned social taboos, so it’s no surprise that so many of them have become part of cannabis culture — whether intentional or not. So to celebrate their contributions, we’ve put together a five-part series on the best marijuana moments from the all-time best standup comics, based on the list of the top 50 Best Stand-Up Comics of All Time published earlier this month by Rolling Stone.

Here’s part one, featuring comedians ranked from #50-41. [Read article on Civilized…]

 

50 Best Stand-Up Comics of All Time — Rolling Stone

By Matthew Love | Rolling Stone | February 14, 2017

Imagine the prototypical female comic of the 1980s: Big hair, suit jacket with shoulder pads and the sleeves rolled up, the ubiquitous brick wall behind her. You’re imagining Elayne Boosler – but before that image became a cliché, it was just part of the stand-up act she had been honing for years.

Read the full article on Rolling Stone.

Can Comedy Defeat ISIS?

ISIS had better watch out because a new weapon might soon be deployed that it will really hate. No, not a new fighter jet or bomb. I’m talking “Borat.” And maybe even Chris Rock and Amy Schumer.

At least that’s what U2 frontman Bono told a Senate subcommittee last week, citing Sacha Baron Cohen, Rock and Schumer by name as he told the senators, “I think comedy should be deployed” in the fight versus ISIS.

— CNN opinion contributor Dean Obeidallah.

Read the full article on CNN.


Photo: When Elayne Boosler arrived on the stage in the ’80s, it seemed she’d been sworn in to tell the whole truth and nothing but the truth. With a crystal-clear voice and a rapid-fire delivery, Boosler was an eviscerating cultural and political commentator who knew how to land a joke. Condoms, crime, Republicans — you could get all of that and more in one sitting. In 1985, she pulled her own funds together to craft “Party of One,” making her the first woman to get her own hour-long TV comedy special.

The David Feldman Show — March 18, 2016

Had the most fun doing David Feldman’s podcast in New York. Lots of never before heard stories. A great listen.

Comedian/writer/animal activist Elayne Boosler is best known for her thoughtful and feisty political humor, and her love of baseball and animals, all sharing a big part of her act. For forty years, she seemingly has appeared on every talk show ever on TV, has produced and written five one-hour Showtime comedy specials, written and directed two movies for Cinemax, appeared on Comic Relief for years, on Politically Incorrect over thirty times, and has hosted specials, series, and events. She has done lots of baseball color commentary, and sung the National Anthem and/or thrown out a first pitch, many times for many teams.

More on The David Feldman Show

Q&A: Elayne Boosler — TheaterJones (Dallas), March 2016

TheaterJones
North Texas Performing Arts News

by Amy Martin
Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Dallas — If you were into comedy in the ‘80s, you were into Elayne Boosler. She was everywhere. Touring, television, talk shows — omnipresent on the Late Show with David Letterman. She churned out a special every couple of years and did it on her own terms. When cable networks declined to do a special in spite of her popularity, saying a woman comedian couldn’t hold down an hour on television, she obtained loans and funded it. Party of One was a big hit and opened the way for females on television who were not just funny, but politically pointed and excruciatingly and honest. Comedians such as Ilza Schlesinger stand in her shoes.

Read the full article on TheaterJones.